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Future electricity systems How to handle millions of power electronic-based devices and other emerging technologies

F. Milano, V. Vittal, F. Silvestro, F. Conte, D. Ramasubramanian, E. Mallada

  • PES
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    IEEE Members: $25.00
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    Pages/Slides: 131
Panel 19 Jul 2023

Several recent studies and practical experiences have shown that future electricity systems dominated by converter-interfaced generators (CIG) will be less secure, faster, complex, and more difficult to control than conventional systems dominated by synchronous machines. Although several aspects contribute to this new paradigm, major challenges stem from the underlying dynamic behavior of CIG and its meaningful differences with conventional generation facilities. Lack of inertial response, low short-circuit current capability, and response times within the electromagnetic timescale are among the key features of CIGs that will threaten the stability of power systems in the future. To further complicate the situation, the shift of energy supply is not only taking place towards large-scale CIG connected at high voltage levels but also towards smaller producers connected to distribution networks (distributed energy resources, DER). Active consumers (prosumers), advanced meter infrastructure, distributed storage devices, electric vehicles and power electronic interfaced loads are further examples of new actors that have begun to be deployed at distribution and low voltage level. These emerging technologies can provide additional flexibility (or ìmicro-flexibilityî) but, if not properly coordinated, will ultimately put even more strain on the grid. The complexity of future electricity networks will go far beyond what we have ever envisaged thus far. We need to conceive a brand-new way of operating and controlling power systems, able to cope with several thousands (or even millions) power electronic-based devices and other emerging technologies broadly deployed across all voltage levels. While a comprehensive solution to this challenge will require innovations at several system levels, the adoption of more active and collaborative control approaches along with an upgraded communication network will certainly be essential for achieving a safe energy transition. Although several issues need to be addressed soon, the proper modeling and control of complex power systems should certainly be a priority for the scientific community. The goal of this panel session is to identify and discuss different challenges related to the modelling and control of future electricity systems with millions of devices at different voltage levels. Among the questions to be discussed are: How do millions of devices affect system stability? How should future power systems be modelled and controlled? How detailed should communication networks be modelled? How should granularity and uncertainty be addressed? Presentations in this panel session: - 23PESGM3897-Controlling the Grid Edge: Can Randomness be the Solution to achieve Stability? - 23PESGM3899-Development of Novel Contactor Model for Composite Loads Using Deep Neural Networks - 23PESGM3900-Investigating the role of aggregated inverter based thermal loads for frequency supports: modeling and use cases - 23PESGM3903-Aggregation of distributed energy resources for transmission planning studies - 23PESGM3975-Frequency Shaping Control for High-IBR Power Systems

Chairs:
Claudia Rahmann, Amarsagar Reddy Ramapuram Matavalam
Primary Committee:
Power Systems Dynamic Performance (PSDP)

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